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Bhagavan
Bhagavān (Sanskrit: भगवान्, Bhagavān) is an epithet for deity, particularly for Krishna and other avatars of Vishnu in Vaishnavism, as well as for Shiva in the Shaivism tradition of Hinduism, and is used by Buddhists to refer to the Buddha. In north India, Bhagavān also represents the concept of abstract God to Hindus who are religious but do not worship a specific deity. The term Bhagavān does not appear in Vedas, nor in early or middle Upanishads. The oldest Sanskrit texts use the term Brahman to represent an abstract Supreme Soul, Absolute Reality, while using names of deities like Krishna, Vishnu, Shiva to represent gods and goddesses
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Vajrayana
Vajrayāna, Mantrayāna, Tantrayāna, Tantric Buddhism and Esoteric Buddhism are the various Buddhist traditions of Tantra and "Secret Mantra", which developed in medieval India and spread to Tibet and East Asia. In Tibet, Buddhist Tantra is termed Vajrayāna, while in China it is generally known as Tángmì (唐密) or Mìzōng (密宗), and in Japan it is known as Mikkyō. Vajrayāna is usually translated as Diamond Vehicle or Thunderbolt Vehicle, referring to the Vajra, a mythical weapon which is also used as a ritual implement. Founded by Indian Mahāsiddhas, Vajrayāna subscribes to the literature known as the Buddhist Tantras. It includes practices that make use of mantras, dharanis, mudras, mandalas and the visualization of deities and Buddhas
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Ganesha
Ganesha (/ɡəˈnʃə/; Sanskrit: गणेश, Gaṇeśa; About this sound listen ), also known as Ganapati, Vinayaka, Pillaiyar and Binayak, is one of the best-known and most worshiped deities in the Hindu pantheon. His image is found throughout India, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Nepal. Hindu denominations worship him regardless of affiliations. Devotion to Ganesha is widely diffused and extends to Jains and Buddhists. Although he is known by many attributes, Ganesha's elephant head makes him easy to identify. Ganesha is widely revered as the remover of obstacles, the patron of arts and sciences and the deva of intellect and wisdom. As the god of beginnings, he is honoured at the start of rites and ceremonies
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Kartikeya
Kartikeya (IAST: Kārttikēya) , also known as Murugan, Skanda, Kumara, and Subrahmanya, is the Hindu god of war. He is the son of Parvati and Shiva, brother of Ganesha, and a god whose life story has many versions in Hinduism. An important deity around South Asia since ancient times, Kartikeya is particularly popular and predominantly worshipped in South India and Sri Lanka as Murugan. Kartikeya is an ancient god, traceable to the Vedic era
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Bhagavati
Bhagavatī (Devanagari: भगवती, IAST: Bhagavatī), is a word of Sanskrit origin, used in India as a polite form to address or as an honorific title for female deities in Hinduism. The male equivalent of Bhagavatī is Bhagavān. The term "Bhagavati" can be used instead of Devi or Ishvari.

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Brahmic Scripts
Egyptian hieroglyphs 32 c. BCE --->
  • Proto-Sinaitic 19 c. BCE
  • Phoenician 12 c. BCE
  • Libyco-Berber 3 c. BCE
  • Paleohispanic (semi-syllabic) 7 c. BCE
  • Aramaic 8 c. BCE
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  • Hebrew 3 c. BCE
  • Pahlavi 3 c. BCE
  • Palmyrene 2 c. BCE
  • Syriac 2 c. BCE
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  • Sogdian 2 c. BCE
  • Old Uyghur
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  • Mandaic 2 c
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    Theravada
    Theravāda (/ˌθɛrəˈvɑːdə/; Pali, literally "school of the elder monks") is a branch of Buddhism that uses the Buddha's teaching preserved in the Pāli Canon as its doctrinal core. The Pali canon is the only complete Buddhist canon which survives in a classical Indic Language, Pali, which serves as the sacred language and lingua franca of Theravada Buddhism. Another feature of Theravada is its tendency to be very conservative with regard to matters of doctrine and monastic discipline. As a distinct sect, Theravada Buddhism developed in Sri Lanka and spread to the rest of Southeast Asia. Theravāda also includes a rich diversity of traditions and practices that have developed over its long history of interactions with varying cultures and religious communities
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    Mahayana
    Mahāyāna (/ˌmɑːhəˈjɑːnə/; Sanskrit for "great vehicle") is one of two (or three, under some classifications) main existing branches of Buddhism and a term for classification of Buddhist philosophies and practice. This movement added a further set of discourses, and although it was initially small in India, it had long-term historical significance. The Buddhist tradition of Vajrayana is sometimes classified as a part of Mahayana Buddhism, but some scholars may consider it as a different branch altogether. According to the teachings of Mahāyāna traditions, "Mahāyāna" also refers to the path of the Bodhisattva seeking complete enlightenment for the benefit of all sentient beings, also called "Bodhisattvayāna", or the "Bodhisattva Vehicle". A bodhisattva who has accomplished this goal is called a samyaksaṃbuddha, or "fully enlightened Buddha"
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    Prabhu
    Prabhu means master or the Prince in Sanskrit and many of the Indian languages; it is a name sometimes applied to God. The term is also used by male devotees of the Hindu God Lord Krishna/Vishnu as a title and form of address. If a man sees another male devotee whom he does not know, he will address him as "Prabhu". It is also appended after a devotee's name, for example "Madhava Prabhu"
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    Purana
    The Puranas (/pʊˈrɑːnəz/; singular: Sanskrit: पुराण purāṇa), are ancient Hindu texts eulogizing various deities, primarily the divine Trimurti God in Hinduism through divine stories
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    Bog (other)
    Bog or The Bog may also refer to:

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    Vishnu Purana
    Divisions

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    Mundaka Upanishad
    The Mundaka Upanishad (Sanskrit: मुण्डक उपनिषद्, Muṇḍaka Upaniṣad) is an ancient Sanskrit Vedic text, embedded inside Atharva Veda. It is a Mukhya (primary) Upanishad, and is listed as number 5 in the Muktika canon of 108 Upanishads of Hinduism. It is among the most widely translated Upanishads. It is a poetic verse style Upanishad, with 64 verses, written in the form of mantras. However, these mantras are not used in rituals, rather they are used for teaching and meditation on spiritual knowledge. The Mundaka Upanishad contains three Mundakams (parts), each with two sections. The first Mundakam, states Roer, defines the science of "Higher Knowledge" and "Lower Knowledge", and then asserts that acts of oblations and pious gifts are foolish, and do nothing to reduce unhappiness in current life or next, rather it is knowledge that frees
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    Kali-Saṇṭāraṇa Upaniṣad
    The Kali-Santarana Upanishad (Sanskrit: कलिसन्तरणोपनिषद्, IAST: Kali-Saṇṭāraṇa Upaniṣad), also called Kalisantaraṇopaniṣad, is a Sanskrit text attached to the Kṛṣṇa Yajurveda. It is a minor Upanishad of Hinduism. The Upanishad was likely composed before about 1500 CE, and it was popularized in the 16th century by Chaitanya in the Gaudiya Vaishnavism tradition. The short text presents two verses called the Maha-mantra, containing the words Hare, Krishna and Rama. The word Hare or goddess Radha is repeated eight times, while the other two are Hindu gods who are repeated four times
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    Prakṛti
    Prakṛti, also Prakṛiti or Prakṛuti (from Sanskrit language प्रकृति, prakṛti), means "nature". It is a key concept in Hinduism, formulated by its Samkhya school, and refers to the primal matter with three different innate qualities (Guṇas) whose equilibrium is the basis of all observed empirical reality. Prakrit
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