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Arad County
Arad County (Romanian pronunciation: [aˈrad] (listen)) is an administrative division (judeţ) of Romania roughly translated into county in the western part of the country on the border with Hungary, mostly in the region of Crișana and few villages in Banat. The administrative center of the county lies in the city of Arad
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Ahtum

Ajtony, Ahtum or Achtum (Hungarian: Ajtony, Bulgarian: Охтум, Romanian: Ahtum, Serbian: Ахтум) was an early-11th-century ruler in the territory now known as Banat in present Romania and Serbia. His primary source is the Long Life of Saint Gerard, a 14th-century hagiography. Ajtony was a powerful ruler who owned many horses, cattle and sheep and was baptised according to the Orthodox rite in Vidin. He taxed salt which was transferred to King Stephen I of Hungary on the Mureș River. The king sent Csanád, Ajtony's former commander-in-chief, against him at the head of a large army. Csanád defeated and killed Ajtony, occupying his realm. In the territory, at least one county and a Ajtony, Ahtum or Achtum (Hungarian: Ajtony, Bulgarian: Охтум, Romanian: Ahtum, Serbian: Ахтум) was an early-11th-century ruler in the territory now known as Banat in present Romania and Serbia
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Dacians
The Dacians (/ˈdʃənz/; Latin: Daci [ˈd̪aːkiː]; Greek: Δάκοι,[2] Δάοι,[2] Δάκαι[3]) were a Thracian[4][5][6] people who were the ancient inhabitants of the cultural region of Dacia, located in the area near the Carpathian Mountains and west of the Black Sea. This area includes mainly the present-day countries of Romania and Moldova, as well as parts of Ukraine,[7] Eastern Serbia, Northern Bulgaria, Slovakia,[8] Hungary and Southern Poland.[7] The Dacians spoke the Dacian language, a sub-group of Thracian, but were somewhat culturally influenced by the neighbouring Scythians and by the Celtic invaders of the 4th century BC.[
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Fortress
A fortification is a military construction or building designed for the defense of territories in warfare, and is also used to establish rule in a region during peacetime. The term is derived from the Latin fortis ("strong") and facere ("to make"). From very early history to modern times, defensive walls have often been necessary for cities to survive in an ever-changing world of invasion and conquest. Some settlements in the Indus Valley Civilization were the first small cities to be fortified. In ancient Greece, large stone walls had been built in Mycenaean Greece, such as the ancient site of Mycenae (famous for the huge stone blocks of its 'cyclopean' walls). A Greek phrourion was a fortified collection of buildings used as a military garrison, and is the equivalent of the Roman castellum or English fortress. These constructions mainly served the purpose of a watch tower, to guard certain roads, passes, and borders
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Romanians

The Romanians (Romanian: Români, pronounced [roˈmɨnʲ]) are a Romance[53][54][55][56] ethnic group and nation native to Romania, that share a common Romanian culture, ancestry, and speak the Romanian language, the most widespread spoken Balkan Romance language, which is descended from the Latin language
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Voivode
Voivode, Vojvoda or Wojewoda (/ˈvɔɪˌvd/, also Воевода/Voyevoda, Войвода/Wojwoda, Войвода/Wojwoda), etc. is a Slavic title denoting a "military-leader" or "warlord" in Central, Eastern and Southern Europe since the Early Middle Ages. During the Byzantine Empire it referred to military commanders mainly of Slavic populations. Voivode, Vojvoda or Wojewoda is a term with two roots, firstly, voi related to warring and secondly, vod meaning leading in Old Slavic, together denoting a "war-leader" or "warlord". The Latin translation is comes palatinus for the principal commander of a military force, deputising for the monarch. In early Slavic vojevoda meant the bellidux the military leader in battle. The term has also spread to non-Slavic languages in the area like Hungarian and Romanian
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German Language

German (Deutsch, pronounced [dɔʏtʃ] (listen))[nb 4] is a West Germanic language that is mainly spoken in Central Europe. It is the most widely spoken and official or co-official language in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, South Tyrol in Italy, the German-speaking Community of Belgium, and Liechtenstein. It is one of the three official languages of Luxembourg and a co-official language in the Opole Voivodeship in Poland. The German language is most similar to other languages within the West Germanic language branch, including Afrikaans, Dutch, English, the Frisian languages, Low German/Low Saxon, Luxembourgish, and Yiddish. It also contains close similarities in vocabulary to Danish, Norwegian and Swedish, although they belong to the North Germanic group
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Ottomans
The Ottoman Turks (or Osmanlı Turks, Turkish: Osmanlı Türkleri) were the Turkish-speaking people of the Ottoman Empire (c. 1299–1922/1923). Reliable information about the early history of Ottoman Turks remains scarce, but they take their Turkish name, Osmanlı ("Osman" became corrupted in some European languages as "Ottoman"), from the house of Osman I (reigned c. 1299–1326), the founder of the dynasty that ruled the Ottoman Empire for its entire 624 years. Expanding from its base in Bithynia, the Ottoman principality began incorporating other Turkish-speaking Muslims and non-Turkish Christians. Crossing into Europe from the 1350s, coming to dominate the Mediterranean and capturing (1453) Constantinople (the capital city of the Byzantine Empire), the Ottoman Turks blocked all major land routes between Asia and Europe; Western Europeans had to find other ways to trade with the East - [1][
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