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Edirne (US: /ˈdɪərnə, ɛˈ-/,[2][3] Turkish: [eˈdiɾne]), historically known as Adrianople (/ˌdriəˈnpəl/; Latin: Hadrianopolis; founded by the Roman emperor Hadrian on the site of a previous Thracian settlement named Uskudama),[4] is a city in the northwestern Turkish province of Edirne in the region of East Thrace, close to Turkey's borders with Greece and Bulgaria. Edirne served as the third capital city of the Ottoman Empire from 1369 to 1453,[5] before Constantinople (present-day Istanbul) became the empire's fourth and final capital between 1453 and 1922. The city's estimated population in 2014 was 165,979.

Names and etymology

The city was founded as Hadrianopolis (Ἁδριανούπολις in Greek), named after the Roman emperor Hadrian. This name is still used in the modern Greek language (Αδριανούπολη, Adrianoúpoli). The Ottoman name Edirne derives from the Greek name. The name Adrianople was used in English until the Turkish adoption of the Latin alphabet in 1928 made Edirne the internationally recognized name. Bulgarian: Одрин, romanizedOdrin (pronounced [ˈɔdrin]), Albanian: Edrenë, Slovene: Odrin and Serbian: Једрене, romanizedJedrene, are adapted forms of the name Hadrianopolis or of its Turkish version.

History

Selimiye Mosque is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The Statue of the Sinan the Architect (front)
Selimiye Mosque exterior. Sinan the Architect called the Şezade Mosque in Istanbul his apprentice work, the Süleymaniye his journeyman’s work, and the Selimiye his masterpiece. He was 85 when he finished it.
Interior view of the Selimiye Mosque central dome

The through highway that connects Europe to Istanbul, Anatolia and the Middle East passes through Edirne.

Historic buildings and events have elevated tourism's role in the economy.

Industry is developing. Agriculture-based industries (agro-industries) are especially important for the city's economy.

Interior view of the Grand Synagogue of Edirne

  • Interior view of the Selimiye Mosque, Edirne

  • A house in Edirne from the Ottoman period

  • Interior of Eski Cami

  • A historic elementary school building

  • Edirne Main Street

  • Interior view of the Selimiye Mosque, Edirne

  • A house in Edirne from the Ottoman period

  • A house in Edirne from the Ottoman period

  • Interior of Eski Cami

  • A historic elementary s

    A historic elementary school building

  • Edirne Main Street

  • Edirne Main Street

  • Sts. Constantine and Helena Bulgarian Church

  • Fatih Bridge over the Tun

    Fatih Bridge over the Tunca River, with the Kasr-ı Adalet (Justice Pavilion) tower seen in the background

  • Ghazi Mihal Mosque

  • Ghazi Mihal Mosque

  • Part of Muradiye Mosque mihrab

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    A Roman Tower still standing

  • Quarters

    • Avrupa Kent
    • Ayşekadın
    • Binevler
    • Esentepe
    • Kaleiçi
    • Karaağaç
    • Kavgaz
    • Kıyık
    • Kirişhane
    • Kooperatifevleri
    • Kutlutaş
    • Küçükpazar
    • https://www.academia.edu/23674853/Edirne_Ta%C5%9F_K%C3%B6pr%C3%BCleri_Edirne_Stone_Bridges

      1. ^ "HGK" (PDF). General Command of Mapping.
      2. ^ "Edirne". Collins English Dictionary. HarperCollins. Retrieved 3 August 2019.
      3. ^ "Edirne". Merriam-Webster Dictionary. Retrieved 3 August 2019.
      4. ^ a b "Edirne". Encyclopaedia Britannica. Retrieved 31 May 2018.
      5. ^ "In 1363 the Ottoman capital moved from Bursa to Edirne, although Bursa retained its spiritual and economic importance." Ottoman Capital Bursa. Official website of Ministry of Culture and Tourism of the Republic of Turkey. Retrieved 19 December 2014. Contradicted by refs cited in Conquest of Adrianople
      6. ^ Keegan, John (1993). A History of Warfare. Random House. pp. 70–71. ISBN 0-7126-9850-7.
      7. ^ Hupchick, Dennis (2017). The Bulgarian-Byzantine Wars for Early Medieval Balkan Hegemony: silver-lined skulls and blinded armies. US: Palgrave Macmillan. p. 107. ISBN 9783319562056.
      8. ^ Saint-Guillain, G. (1216) Identities and Allegiances in the Eastern Mediterranean after 1204, Routledge, p. 66
      9. ^ "It served as the capital of the Ottoman Empire from 1413 until 1458 and flourished as an administrative, commercial, and cultural centre." "Edirne" Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved 19 December 2014
      10. ^ John Kingsley Birge, The Bektashi Order of Dervishes, 1982 (p 60 - 62)
      11. ^ "Adrianopel" in Nordisk familjebok (2nd edition, 1904)
      12. ^ "Bahaʼi Reference Library - The Kitáb-i-Aqdas, Page 196". Reference.bahai.org. 31 December 2010. Retrieved 30 July 2011.
      13. ^ Romein, Jan (translated by R. T. Clark). The Asian Century: A History of Modern Nationalism in Asia (De eeuw van Azie). University of California Press, 1962. p. 170. "In 1930 geographical names were 'turkicized'. [...] Adrianople Edirne, and so on."
      14. ^ Cagaptay, Soner (2006). Islam, Secularism, and Nationalism in Modern Turkey; Who is a Turk. Routledge. p. 47.
      15. ^ Bayir, Derya (2016-04-22). Minorities and Nationalism in Turkish Law. Routledge. p. 141. ISBN 978-1-317-09579-8.Coordinates: 41°40′N 26°34′E / 41.667°N 26.567°E / 41.667; 26.567

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