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This page lists English translations of notable Latin phrases, such as veni vidi vici and et cetera. Some of the phrases are themselves translations of Greek phrases, as Greek rhetoric and literature reached its peak centuries before the rise of ancient Rome.

This list covers the letter I. See List of Latin phrases for the main list.
Latin Translation Notes
I, Vitelli, dei Romani sono belli Go, oh Vitellius, at the war sound of the Roman god Perfectly correct Latin sentence usually reported as funny by modern Italians because the same exact words, in Italian, mean "Romans' calves are beautiful", which has a ridiculously different meaning.
ibidem (ibid.) in the same place Usually used in bibliographic citations to refer to the last source previously referenced.
id est (i.e.) that is (literally "it is") "That is (to say)" in the sense of "that means" and "which means", or "in other words", "namely", or sometimes "in this case", depending on the context.
id quod plerumque accidit that which generally happens A phrase used in legal language to indicate the most probable outcome from an act, fact, event or cause.
idem (id.) the same Used to refer to something that has already been cited; ditto. See also ibidem.
idem quod (i.q.) the same as Not to be confused with an intelligence quotient.
Idus Martiae the Ides of March In the Roman calendar, the Ides of March refers to the 15th day of March. In modern times, the term is best known as the date on which Julius Caesar was assassinated in 44 BC; the term has come to be used as a metaphor for impending doom.
Jesu juva (J.J.) Jesus, help! Used by Johann Sebastian Bach at the beginning of his compositions, which he ended with "S.D.G." (Soli Deo gloria). Compare Besiyata Dishmaya.
Iesus Nazarenus Rex Iudaeorum (INRI) Jesus the Nazarene, King of the Jews
From Vulgate; John 19:19. John 19:20 states that this inscription was written in three languages—Aramaic, Latin and Greek—at the top of the cross during the crucifixion of Jesus.
igitur qui desiderat pacem, praeparet bellum<


References

  1. ^ Baehrens, Emil, ed. (1882). "Excerpta ex Petronio, 74". Poetae Latini Minores. IV. p. 88.
  2. ^ "Introduction". Nature in Cambridgeshire. Cambridgeshire Wildlife Trust/Cambridge Natural History Society. December 2015. Retrieved July 8, 2017.
  3. ^ "Ite Missa Est" from the Catholic Encyclopedia

Additional sources

Additional sources