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Eckhart was schooled in medieval scholasticism and was well-acquainted with Aristotelianism, Augustinianism, and Neo-Platonism.

Teachings

Sermons

Although he was an accomplished academic theologian, Eckhart's best-remembered works are his highly unusual sermons in the vernacular. Eckhart as a preaching friar attempted to guide his flock, as well as monks and nuns under his jurisdiction, with practical sermons on spiritual/psychological transformation and New Testament metaphorical content related to the creative power inherent in disinterest (dispassion or detachment).[citation needed]

The central theme of Eckhart's German sermons is the presence of God in the individual soul, and the dignity of the soul of the just man. Although he elaborated on this theme, he rarely departed from it. In one sermon, Eckhart gives the following summary of his message:[citation needed]

In Z213: Exit, by Z213: Exit, by Dimitris Lyacos the same quote, attributed to Eckhart, appears in a slightly different wording:

[85]

In the book The Gargoyle

In the book The Gargoyle by Andrew Davidson, Eckhart is mentioned in a story Marianne Engel recounts to the (unnamed) protagonist about her days in the Engelthal Monastery:

[86]

Eckhart is also referenced in J. D. SalingerEckhart is also referenced in J. D. Salinger's Franny and Zooey. In a letter to Zooey, Buddy says,

Upanishads and the Diamond Sutra and Eckhart and all our other old loves with the rest of your recommended reading when you were small.[87]

The third movement of John Adams'

The third movement of John Adams's Harmonielehre symphony (1985) is titled "Meister Eckhart and Quackie", which imagines the mystic floating through space with the composer's daughter Emily (nicknamed Quackie) on his back whispering secrets of grace in his ear.[88]

Eckhart Tolle quotes Meister Eckhart in The Power Of Now as saying "Time is what keeps the light from reaching us".[89]

The publication of the modern critical edition of Eckhart's German and Latin works began in 1936, and is nearly complete.[90]

Latin works

One difficulty with Eckhart's Latin writings is that they clearly represent only a small portion of what he planned to write. Eckhart describes his plans to write a vast Opus Tripartitum (Three-Part Work). Unfortunately, all that exists today of the first part, the Work of Propositions, is the Prologue illustrating the first proposition (with Eckhart intending the first part alone to consist of over one thousand propositions).[91] The second part, called the Work of Questions, no longer exists. The third part, the Work of Commentaries, is the major surviving Latin work by Eckhart, consisting of a Prologue, six commentaries, and fifty-six sermons.[92] It used to be thought that this work was begun while Eckhart was in Paris between 1311 and 1313; however, recent manus

One difficulty with Eckhart's Latin writings is that they clearly represent only a small portion of what he planned to write. Eckhart describes his plans to write a vast Opus Tripartitum (Three-Part Work). Unfortunately, all that exists today of the first part, the Work of Propositions, is the Prologue illustrating the first proposition (with Eckhart intending the first part alone to consist of over one thousand propositions).[91] The second part, called the Work of Questions, no longer exists. The third part, the Work of Commentaries, is the major surviving Latin work by Eckhart, consisting of a Prologue, six commentaries, and fifty-six sermons.[92] It used to be thought that this work was begun while Eckhart was in Paris between 1311 and 1313; however, recent manuscript discoveries mean that much of what survives must be dated to before 1310.[93]

The surviving Latin works are, therefore: